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U.S. Constitution: References / Context

US Constitution

Remote / off-campus access to online databases

The physical Library is closed at this time, However, we are available ONLINE! If you need research help or are looking to make copies of a few pages from a text book from our Reserve collection, please refer to the contact information in the "Contact the Library @ LSC-Tomball" box below.

Also, the online databases for articles, ebooks and streaming videos (https://www.lonestar.edu/library/article-databases.htm) are always available remotely to our students 24/7 via the 14-digit Library Barcode. Do not have a library card / barcode#  yet? Fill out and submit this online form: 
https://www.lonestar.edu/library/card.htm#card, to have your barcode sent to your LSC email account.

We the People

United States: The Constitution
"A bibliography on American constitutional law from the Law Library of Congress on such topics as: constitutional interpretation, executive privilege, war initiation, war powers, war powers resolution, state secrets privilege, military tribunals, national security whistleblowers, presidential signing statements, second amendment, presidential inherent powers, and additional constitutional resources."

Ask a Librarian!

Though the library is physically closed, Research Databases containing Articles, eBooks and Videos are available to our students, faculty and staff 24/7.

To access the databases, enter your 14-digit library barcode number located on the back of your college ID/ library card when prompted.  No college ID or library card? Use your myLoneStar username and password by clicking the link below the barcode login when prompted before entering a database.

Have a question? Ask us!

Phone:
Reference832.559.4211
Circulation: 832.559.4206


Chat with a Librarian

Email us: tcref@lonestar.edu
 

 

 SMS / Text us: 281.826.4488

 

Benjamin Franklin: Framing the Constitution

Contact the Library @ LSC-Tomball

Though the library is physically closed, Research Databases containing Articles, eBooks and Videos are available to our students, faculty and staff 24/7.
Have a question? Ask us!

Phone:
Reference832.559.4211 (9 a.m.- 4 p.m.)
Circulation: 832.559.4206


Chat with a Librarian

(Monday - Friday: 8 a.m.- 8 p.m.)
Saturday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

Email us: tcref@lonestar.edu
 

 

 SMS / Text us: 281.826.4488

 

US Constitution

"The framework of US federal government, drafted at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, and ratified in 1788 to take effect from 1789. It replaced the Articles of Confederation (1781). Although the framers of the Constitution sought to increase the power of central (federal) government, they included safeguards against possible tyranny, and the states retain considerable powers of self-government. Certain powers are reserved to the states or forbidden to central government, and the legislative, executive, and judicial branches are separate and hold powers to check and balance each other. Since 1788, the Constitution has had 27 amendments, including the Thirteenth Amendment (1865) abolishing slavery and the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) giving women the vote. Article VI establishes the Constitution as the ‘supreme law of the land’."

US Constitution. (2018). In Helicon (Ed.), The Hutchinson unabridged encyclopedia with atlas and weather guide. Helicon. Credo Reference: 
http://lscsproxy.lonestar.edu/login?url=https://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/heliconhe/
us_constitution/0?institutionId=5037
 

 

Citation Help

APA Style Guide

APA Style7 Guide for References List and In-text citation

Chicago Style Manual

Notes & Bibliography Citation Guide
This guide provides examples and tips on how to cite sources in the Chicago Notes & Bibliography style.

Notes & Bibliography Overview
View this handout for a more detailed explanation of how to use the Chicago Notes & Bibliography style.

MLA Style Guide